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According to podiatrist Louis J. DeCaro, DPM, “Cold feet (even in kids) is a huge problem. Wearing a thin layer of socks consisting of a wicking micro-fiber is essential to keeping those feet warm.” Also, having your child’s foot type checked to see if that could cause a boot fit concern can play a role in keeping feet warm.
 
Dr. Louis DeCaro
 
 
“Care for the core! Keep your core warm, and your feet will stay warmer. If the body does not need to worry about protecting our vital organs, it will keep flowing to the feet better," says Dr. DeCaro.
 
Source: Danny New, NBC WWLP [1/11/19]
 
Courtesy of Barry Block, editor of PM News.
 
Brought to you by Doctor John A. Hardy, owner of Toronto's foot clinic, Academy Foot and Orthotic Clinics.

 

The foot is a complicated body part – home to 26 bones, says Neal Houslanger, DPM, a podiatrist in private practice at Houslanger & Kassnove Podiatrists in Patchogue, NY. This complexity and the heavy-duty wear-and-tear they endure over the years places a lot of stress and strain on our feet over the years. "Each bone needs to be in a specific place, but as we age, our bodies are always changing and usually not for the better," Dr, Houslanger says. 
 
Dr. Neal Houslanger
 
 
One aspect of this process is that "the cells hold less water, which affects the collagen, tendons, and ligaments in the feet. Tendons get tighter and ligaments get looser." When the muscles, tendons, ligaments, and bones shift, that can lead to pain and bony growths, among other problems. In addition to less water in the cells, "our circulation diminishes, so our healing ability lessens" as we age, Houslanger says, making older adults "more prone to infections and other issues." As people are living longer, overuse and joint injuries in the feet are also becoming more common.
 
Source: Elaine K. Howley, U.S. News & World Report [1/16/19]
 
Courtesy of Barry Block, editor of PM News.
 
Brought to you by Doctor John A. Hardy, owner of Toronto's foot clinic, Academy Foot and Orthotic Clinics.

 

Howard Osterman, DPM has seen a renaissance of foot care in the NBA. Dr. Osterman, the president of the American Academy of Podiatric Sports Medicine and the team podiatrist for the Wizards, has noticed how the NBA occupational hazard of often wearing new shoes can partially explain the trauma on players' feet. The shoes never quite break in, and the skin around the foot has to grow thick layers to absorb the excessive stopping and starting on the court. Over time, the pressure causes calluses to build up on the bottom of the foot, and painful ingrown toenails also develop. But unlike in past generations, Osterman believes today’s players are more inclined to fix these problems with a proper pedicure.
 
 
Dr. Howard Osterman
 
 
“Taking care of their feet is one of the most important things these guys can do,” Osterman said. “There was a stigma for a long time where guys didn’t go get pedicures, and then guys like Shaq and Dwyane Wade and LeBron, they made it popular. And you know what? If the stars can do it, then it’s okay. So, it’s really gotten better.”
 
Source: Candace Buckner, The Washington Post [1/16/19]
 
Courtesy of Barry Block, editor of PM News.
 
Brought to you by Doctor John A. Hardy, owner of Toronto's foot clinic, Academy Foot and Orthotic Clinics.

 

Frostbite is a serious tissue destroying disorder. It is something that is not often anticipated in relatively mild winter temperatures. The Michigan Podiatric Medical Association (MPMA) encourages everyone to stay alert and take precautions to avoid the unnecessary distress of frostbite.
 
Dr. Jodie Sengstock
 
 
“When you're out in the cold, your body works hard to stay warm by altering blood flow toward your heart and lungs,” said Dr. Jodie Sengstock, MPMA Director of Professional Relations. “This leaves your extremities – arms, legs and feet – vulnerable to cold injury, especially toes and fingers.” Depending on the severity of the exposure, frostbite can affect the skin or underlying tissue. In most cases, the area becomes numb and feels frozen. Skin will appear waxy, white, or grayish. Any exposure should be evaluated and treated by a physician.
 
Source: Press & Guide [1/13/19]
 
Courtesy of Barry Block, editor of PM News.
 
Brought to you by Doctor John A. Hardy, owner of Toronto's foot clinic, Academy Foot and Orthotic Clinics.

 

It’s one of the most common reasons patients visit a podiatrist. “Heel pain, there are a lot of things that can cause it. Depending on if you’re a runner who is active and running on pavement, or if you’re older and your foot has flattened out, there are a whole host of things that can cause it,” explained Dr. Sean Dunleavy, a podiatric surgeon on the medical staff of Lee Health.
 
Dr. Sean Dunleavy
 
 
One of the most common causes is exercise footwear. “They will relate having done some extra activity, or a new workout, or they ran a little further, but one of the biggest ones is new shoes,” said Dr. Dunleavy.
 
Source: Lindsey Morton, NBC2 News [1/14/19]
 
Courtesy of Barry Block, editor of PM News.
 
Brought to you by Doctor John A. Hardy, owner of Toronto's foot clinic, Academy Foot and Orthotic Clinics.

 





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