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More than 12,000 Californians lost limbs or toes to diabetes in 2016, state data show. “Most of those amputations are unnecessary,” said Alexander Reyzelman, DPM, co-director of the UCSF clinic that saves legs with procedures to increase blood flow. Amputation can cause as many health problems as it solves, according to Dr. Reyzelman: “When you lose a leg to amputation, 50 to 70% of patients will die within five years. You don’t want to lose a leg.”
 
Drs. Alexander Reyzelman and David Armstrong

The increase in diabetes and the threat of amputation are “a silent, sinister crisis,” said Dr. David Armstrong, a podiatric surgeon teaching at the University of Southern California’s Keck School of Medicine. “The problem is getting bigger and bigger, and you can’t fight it by just chopping off a leg.”

Source: David Gom, CALmatters [8/2/18]
 
Courtesy of Barry Block, editor of PM News.
 
Brought to you by Doctor John A. Hardy, owner of Toronto's foot clinic, Academy Foot and Orthotic Clinics.

 

“Not every shoe within a brand is going to be right for you,” says Lori Weisenfeld, DPM, a sports podiatrist. “Generally, people with a flat foot need a supportive shoe and less cushioning,” she said. “If somebody has a very high-arched foot, they tend to need more cushioning.”
 
Dr. Lori Weisenfeld
 
 
If you want shoes for foot pain that will keep you comfortable while walking around town, running errands, or doing jobs that require you to be on your feet, avoid overly flat shoes. “For spending a lot of time on your feet you want it to have a little bit of heel rise, or you can add a heel lift into a very flat shoe,” Weisenfeld says. If you need more arch support, a well-made insole, even if it’s inside an inexpensive shoe, can go a long way.
 
Source: Shape [9/18/18]
 
Courtesy of Barry Block, editor of PM News.
 
Brought to you by Doctor John A. Hardy, owner of Toronto's foot clinic, Academy Foot and Orthotic Clinics.
 

A recent study in the British Journal of Sports Medicine took a look at treatments for a common heel pain called plantar fasciitis. The study found that stretching is often the most effective way to reduce plantar faciitis pain. "It's all about stretching, releasing the tension on your calf and the plantar facia," said Darren Di Iulio, DPM, podiatrist at St. Elizabeth Healthcare.
 
Dr. Darren Di Iulio
 
 
In the study, researchers discovered in the study that the orthotics work best combined with other treatments such as physical therapy, which teaches you how to stretch. "The second thing that the study showed is that not every patient needs a custom, super-expensive rolls-royce orthotic," Dr. Di Iulio said. "Most can use an over-the-counter orthotic that will help them just as much as the custom orthotic."
 
Source: Liz Bonis, WKRC [9/18/18]
 
Courtesy of Barry Block, editor of PM News.
 
Brought to you by Doctor John A. Hardy, owner of Toronto's foot clinic, Academy Foot and Orthotic Clinics.

 

According to Ramona Brooks, DPM, a podiatrist and spokesperson for the American Podiatric Medical Association, there are a range of precautions you can take to avoid developing calluses. First make sure you have an adequate fitting shoe, advises Brooks. “You don’t want a shoe that’s too large where the foot is moving around,” she said. “That causes areas of friction and rubbing and that’s how you end up developing a blister that later can develop into a callus.”
 
Dr. Ramona Brooks
 
 
Dr. Brooks also recommends avoiding pointy-toe shoes in favor or styles with a roomier rounded or squared toe box, lessening the chances of feet rubbing against the interior of the toe area. Moisturizing your feet is another way to help prevent the thickening of roughened skin, according to Brooks, coupled with regular exfoliation with a pumice stone or file. Thickening of the skin is the body’s way to protect itself from friction at pressure points.
 
Source: Barbara Schneider-Levy, Footwear News [9/9/18]
 
Courtesy of Barry Block, editor of PM News.
 
Brought to you by Doctor John A. Hardy, owner of Toronto's foot clinic, Academy Foot and Orthotic Clinics.

“A bone spur on its own does not cause pain,” said R. Brent Harbin, DPM, a podiatrist with Tennova Foot and Ankle. “However, depending on the size and location of the spur, it can interact with nearby structures like tendons, nerves, or other bones, which can result in acute pain and loss of motion.”  
 
Dr. R. Brent Harbin
 
 
According to Dr. Harbin, joint damage from osteoarthritis is one of the most common causes of bone spurs. “As arthritis breaks down the cartilage cushioning the edges of your bones, your body attempts to repair the loss by growing bone spurs in the damaged area. Other potential causes and risk factors include overuse of a joint, obesity, genetic bone problems, conditions like gout or lupus, and spinal stenosis,” he said.
 
Source: Citizen Tribune [9/18/18]
 
Courtesy of Barry Block, editor of PM News.
 
Brought to you by Doctor John A. Hardy, owner of Toronto's foot clinic, Academy Foot and Orthotic Clinics.

 





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