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TORONTO CHIROPODIST, D.Ch., B.Sc., PODIATRIC MEDICINE

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According to James Hanna, DPM, "Diabetes affects just about every part of the body—including your feet. If it goes undiagnosed for a while or is poorly managed over a long period of time, diabetes can cause a decrease in circulation and nerve function. That’s a problem because neuropathy can lead to numbness in your feet, which can make it difficult to feel that a shoe doesn’t fit properly. Combine nerve damage with ill-fitting shoes, and you have the perfect storm for trouble: blisters and skin breakdown that can lead to infection. "
 
Dr. James Hanna

 
 
"Poor circulation can slow the healing of ulcers and other wounds, which can up the risk for gangrene and even amputation. Other factors, such as bunions, hammertoes, arthritis, and swelling, may also adversely affect how a shoe fits. People with these conditions may find that selecting a shoe or sneaker off-the-shelf leads to problems," says Dr. Hanna.
 
Source: Diabetes Forecast [November 2017]
 
Courtesy of Barry Block, editor of PM News.
 
 Brought to you by Doctor John A. Hardy, owner of Toronto's Foot Clinic, Academy Foot and Orthotic Clinics.

 

 

 

 

A study by researchers at Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) and Harvard Medical School suggests new guidelines may be in order for evaluating and treating lower extremity pain. Investigators set out to determine if there was a relation between foot pain and lower extremity joint pain, and they found a significant association between foot pain and knee or hip pain. "Studying the interaction between the knee and the foot, or the hip and the foot is very important because it's a kinetic chain," says Rock G. Positano, DPM, MPH, director of the Non-Surgical Foot and Ankle Service, Joe DiMaggio Sports Medicine Foot and Ankle Center at HSS.
 
Dr. Rock Positano
 
 
The kinetic chain, the notion that the body's joints and segments have an effect on one another during movement, can play a key role in pain. "The foot is the first part of the body that makes contact with the ground. Its primary function is a shock absorber. If the shock-absorbing capability of the foot is somehow altered or minimized, it's going to affect other body parts," Dr. Positano explains. Researchers found that foot pain was associated with bilateral and same-side knee pain in men and women. For example, men with right foot pain compared to those with no foot pain were five to seven times more likely to have pain in their right knee or in both knees. "Our overall goal was to provide practitioners with evidence-based guidance for evaluation and options for treatment for their patients," the researchers wrote in their paper, which appeared in the Journal of the American Podiatric Medical Association.
 
Source: EurekAlert [9/19/17]
 
Courtesy of Barry Block, editor of PM News.  
 
Brought to you by Doctor John A. Hardy, owner of Toronto's Foot Clinic, Academy Foot and Orthotic Clinics.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In the pecking order of what we care about body-wise, we tend to put show-off muscles—chest, arms, abs—at the top of the list. For whatever reason, the gluteus maximus (GM)  gets minimus attention. Maybe it’s because it’s “out of sight, out of mind.” Maybe it’s because we don’t know much about why it’s really one of our body’s most important muscles. All that aside, the truth is that the GM and its brother muscles serve as foundational structures in our anatomy—ones that can prevent injuries, and ones that can make us stronger, faster, and healthier.
 
Dr. Stephen Pribut
 
 
“Weak glutes contribute to many problems in areas besides the pelvic area—from ITB syndrome to patellofemoral syndrome to back pain and a host of other problems. Developing both strength and also flexibility at the back and hip region is critical for lower limb health and function,” says Stephen Pribut, DPM, a sports-medicine podiatrist.
 
Source: Ted Spiker, Esquire [9/20/17]
 
Courtesy of Barry Block, editor of PM News.  
 
Brought to you by Doctor John A. Hardy, owner of Toronto's Foot Clinic, Academy Foot and Orhtotics Clinics.

 

 

 

 

 

“This might seem surprising, but one of the biggest complaints with older patients is dry skin on the feet,” says podiatrist Kenneth Kilgore, DPM of Lititz Podiatry. Dry skin may actually be a variation of athletes foot, Kilgore says. It may not itch or burn, but it causes redness, irritation, crease lines, and flakiness, which allow bacteria to take hold. That can cause toenail fungus and foot infections that can be difficult to treat.
 
Dr. Kenneth Kilgore
 
 
Ironically, the dryness comes from moisture. When your feet sweat or get damp in your shoes, they end up getting dry and cracked. Kilgore recommends soaking your feet in tepid water, followed by a thorough drying of the feet and application of a soothing ointment that will keep your feet moisturized and help fight bacteria.
 
Source: Laura Knowles, Lancaster Online
 
Courtesy of Barry Block, editor of PM News.
 
 Brought to you by Doctor John A. Hardy, owner of Toronto's Foot Clinic, Academy Foot and Orthotic Clinics.
 
 

 

 

 

 

Soccer season is in full swing and it is important for parents and coaches to think twice before letting a young, injured player “play through” foot and ankle pain. "In the immature athlete, starting and stepping and moving side-to-side on cleats (that are no more than moccasins with spikes) is a foot and ankle injury waiting to happen. The young athlete who has a lingering, nagging heel pain may have a stress fracture. Stress fractures do not always show up on initial x-ray, so parents and coaches may not have been aware of it," says podiatrist Robert F. Weiss, DPM.
 
Dr. Robert Weiss
 
 
"When playing with pain, they can’t give their team 100 percent and it makes the injury worse. Rest, physical therapy and, in some cases, immobilization are needed to relieve the inflammation. Other types of overuse injuries are Achilles tendonitis and plantar fasciitis," said Dr. Weiss .
 
Source: Darien News [9/22/17]
 
Courtesy of Barry Block, editor of PM News.
 
Brought to you by Doctor John A. Hardy, owner of Toronto's Foot Clinic, Academy Foot and Orthotic Clinics.
 
 





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416-465-8737

Toronto, ON Chiropodist
Academy Foot and Orthotic

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Toronto, ON M4K 2P1 

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CHIROPODIST / FOOT SPECIALIST,  B.Sc. PODIATRIC MEDICINE / ACADEMY FOOT & ORTHOTIC CLINICS, 752 Broadview Ave , Toronto ON, M4K 2P1 416-465-8737