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Posts for tag: stress fractures

"Stress fractures of the foot are becoming more common in runners, especially first-time marathoners. The growing popularity of marathons among beginning runners has contributed to the increase in repetitive stress injuries, including stress fractures of the foot. Often, first-time marathoners enter a race with little or improper long-distance training. The lack of experience coupled with the repetitive impact placed on the feet during the run can produce enough stress to cause hairline breaks in the bones of the foot," says Jeff Ash, DPM.
 
Dr. Jeff Ash
 
 
"Runners at all levels of experience are also at higher risk for stress fractures if they wear improper shoes while running or training, suffer from flatfoot or other foot deformities, or have osteoporosis. Signs of a stress fracture can include pain, swelling, redness, and possibly bruising of the area," says Dr. Ash.
 
Source: Rosewell Daily Record [3/2/19]
 
Courtesy of Barry Block, editor of PM News.
 
Brought to you by Doctor John A. Hardy, owner of Toronto's foot clinic, Academy Foot and Orthotic Clinics.

 

Repeated stress (like the continuous pounding of running) can cause a tiny break in the bone, also known as a stress fracture. “The metatarsal bones, which make up the front part of the arch, are a common area for stress fractures with the second and third metatarsals being affected most often,” says Loretta Logan, DPM, an associate professor at the New York College of Podiatric Medicine & Foot Center of New York. “The pain is typically felt at a specific and localized spot, usually on the top portion of the bone.” Sadly, your stress fracture might not be obvious at first, which puts you at risk for making it worse: “The pain may be mild at first, but it can intensify with time if you don’t take care of it.”
 
Dr. Loretta Logan
 
 
“Stress fractures take about six to eight weeks to heal and are routinely treated with rest, ice, compression, and elevation,” Logan says. Rest is key here: “Ice and NSAID medication may assist in early days, but the fastest pathway to healing is through relative off-loading of the fracture site.” To be clear, that means no running until your doc says so. Some doctors may even prescribe a walking boot to help take some load off the affected area. The stakes are high: A stress fracture can turn into a fracture-fracture (or full break) if you aren’t careful.
 
Source: Kiera Carter, Runner's World [11/3/18]
 
Courtesy of Barry Block, editor of PM News.
 
Brought to you by Doctor John A. Hardy, owner of Toronto's foot clinic, Academy Foot and Orthotic Clinics.

 

 

 

 

 

Stress fractures of the foot are becoming more common in runners, especially first-time marathoners, according to San Antonio, Texas foot and ankle surgeon Eddie Davis, DPM. “Runners who increase their mileage too quickly or change to a more intense phase of training may be more susceptible to a stress fracture due to the increased force placed on the bones,” says Dr. Davis. 

Dr. Eddie Davis

“A general rule of thumb for runners is to increase the mileage by no more than 10 percent each week. Runners who are training also need to have adequate rest time in between runs to help decrease the risk of a fracture.” If a break is suspected, Dr. Davis advises runners to immediately follow the RICE protocol—Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevation. If pain and swelling last longer than a few days, an appointment for imaging and a diagnosis is in order. 

Source: Tucson News Now [2/13/18] Courtesy of Barry Block, PM News.  Brought to you by Doctor John A. Hardy, owner of Toronto's Foot Clinic, Academy Foot and Orthotic Clinics.

 

 

 

 

ABPM-certified podiatrist Melissa Lockwood, DPM, says nearly one in five runners she sees is for a stress fracture. Stress fractures are characterized as "overuse injuries." They occur when a bone experiences repeated, unusual force, says Dr. Lockwood, who's based in Bloomington, Illinois: “For example, when runners increase their distance and speed—basically anything that changes the amount of pressure they’re putting on the body.” 
 
While stress fractures are associated with running, “they can also be caused by regular force if the bones are weakened by other problems, such as osteoporosis or another systematic problem like an eating disorder,” adds Dr. Lockwood. Research suggests women are more susceptible, possibly because they're more prone to the above-mentioned conditions. But really, stress fractures can affect anyone. Dr. Lockwood got one in her foot after walking around Disney World all day.
 
Source: Kristine Thomason, Health.com [5/18/17]
 
Courtesy of Barry Block, PMP News.  
 
Brought to you by Dr. John A. Hardy, owner of Toronto's Foot Clinic, Academy Foot and Orthotic Clinics.
 
 

 

 

 

 

Podiatric surgeon Dr. Jacqueline Sutera explains what could happen to our feet if we run too much and over-train for that next half marathon. "Running is a super-high-impact sport, and there's a lot of body weight with every step that you take. It increases by about seven times your body weight with every step that you take when you're running."
 
"You can develop heel spurs, plantar fasciitis ,tendinitis, stress fractures, knee pain, hip pain, back pain — the list goes on and on. I think fractures are the worst thing because it really takes a long time to heal. For a lot of tendon issues and plantar fasciitis, those can  heal in a couple of weeks, but once you fracture your foot, you're talking six to eight weeks of not running. And this leads to a lot of tears in my office," says Sutera.
 
Source: Arielle Berger, Business Insider [5/18/17]
 
Courtesy of Barry Block of PMP News.
 
Brought to you by Dr. John A. Hardy, owner of Toronto's Foot Clinic, Academy Foot and Orthotic Clinics.
 
 

 

 



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