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TORONTO CHIROPODIST, D.Ch., B.Sc., PODIATRIC MEDICINE

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Posts for tag: foot warts

A wart or plantar wart if on the foot, also known as  verruca is a viral infection and can be picked up from coming into contact with the virus. To try and avoid catching one try not to come into contact with the changing room floor by wearing something like flip flops in the changing room and to the pool edge. If you already have a verruca, keep it covered. Verruca socks are available, which are slim fit rubber socks that prevent the virus being spread or picked up. (Not very popular due to the look of them).

To find the difference between a verrucae and a corn the usual test is to pinch the suspect area. Verrucae are usually more painful than corns when pinched. Corns and callous are more likely to affect weightbearing areas, whereas verrucae can appear on any area.  

Academy Foot and Orthotic Clinics has been treating plantar warts very successfull for many years.  We have every option avilable including the most advanced technique which is laser.  Every person and situation is different and may require a different approach.  That is why our highly educated and skilled team of foot care specialists are able to achieve a very high rate of success.  

If you or a loved ine requires honest, competent advice or quality foot care and custom foot orthotics, please do not hesitat to contact us at 416-465-8737.

Warts are one of several soft tissue conditions of the foot that can be quite painful. They are caused by a virus, which generally invades the skin through small or invisible cuts and abrasions. They can appear anywhere on the skin, but technically only those on the sole are properly called plantar warts.

Children, especially teenagers, tend to be more susceptible to warts than adults; some people seem to be immune.

Identification Problems
Most warts are harmless, even though they may be painful. They are often mistaken for corns or calluses—which are layers of dead skin that build up to protect an area which is being continuously irritated. The wart, however, is a viral infection.

It is also possible for a variety of more serious lesions to appear on the foot, including malignant lesions such as carcinomas and melanomas. Although rare, these conditions can sometimes be misidentified as a wart. It is wise to consult a Chiropodist when any suspicious growth or eruption is detected on the skin of the foot in order to ensure a correct diagnosis.

Plantar warts tend to be hard and flat, with a rough surface and well-defined boundaries; warts are generally raised and fleshier when they appear on the top of the foot or on the toes. Plantar warts are often gray or brown (but the color may vary), with a center that appears as one or more pinpoints of black. It is important to note that warts can be very resistant to treatment and have a tendency to reoccur.

Source of the Virus
The plantar wart is often contracted by walking barefoot on dirty surfaces or littered ground where the virus is lurking. The causative virus thrives in warm, moist environments, making infection a common occurrence in communal bathing facilities.

If left untreated, warts can grow to an inch or more in circumference and can spread into clusters of several warts; these are often called mosaic warts. Like any other infectious lesion, plantar warts are spread by touching, scratching, or even by contact with skin shed from another wart. The wart may also bleed, another route for spreading.

Occasionally, warts can spontaneously disappear after a short time, and, just as frequently, they can recur in the same location.

When plantar warts develop on the weight-bearing areas of the foot—the ball of the foot, or the heel, for example—they can be the source of sharp, burning pain. Pain occurs when weight is brought to bear directly on the wart, although pressure on the side of a wart can create equally intense pain.

Tips for Prevention

  • Avoid walking barefoot, except on sandy beaches.
  • Change shoes and socks daily.
  • Keep feet clean and dry.
  • Check children's feet periodically.
  • Avoid direct contact with warts—from other persons or from other parts of the body.
  • Do not ignore growths on, or changes in, your skin.
  • Visit your Chiropodist as part of your annual health checkup.

Self Treatment
Self treatment is generally not advisable. Over-the-counter preparations contain acids or chemicals that destroy skin cells, and it takes an expert to destroy abnormal skin cells (warts) without also destroying surrounding healthy tissue. Self treatment with such medications especially should be avoided by people with diabetes and those with cardiovascular or circulatory disorders. Never use them in the presence of an active infection.

Tips for Individuals with Warts

  • Avoid self treatment with over-the-counter preparations.
  • Seek professional chiropody evaluation and assistance with the treatment of your warts.
  • Diabetics and other patients with circulatory, immunological, or neurological problems should be especially careful with the treament of their warts.
  • Warts may spread and are catching. Make sure you have your warts evaluated to protect yourself and those close to you.Dr. Hardy's Toronto Foot Doctor, Academy Foot and Orthotic Clinics treat a lot of patients with plantar warts.  We are fully equipped to successfully treat all types of warts.  We have cryotherapy, chemical and laser methods as well as dermoscopy to ensure the wart has been completely eradicated.  If you or a loved one requires honest, competent advice or quality foot care, please do not hesitate to contact us at 416-465-8737.

Warts on the foot

A wart is a growth in the skin caused by a viral infection. Warts tend to be hard and flat with elevated, rough surfaces with well-defined boundaries. Some have one or more black pinpoints. They are frequently called plantar warts because they appear on the plantar surface, or sole of the foot. Children, especially teenagers, tend to be more susceptible to warts than adults.

It is possible that a variety of other more serious lesions, including carcinomas and melanomas (cancers), can be mistakenly identified as warts. Because of those identification problems, it is wise to consult a chiropodist about any suspicious growth or eruption on the skin of the feet.

If warts are left untreated, they can grow and spread into clusters of several warts.

Causes of warts

  • A virus causes warts, which typically invade the skin through small cuts and abrasions.

What can you do to avoid getting warts?

  • Avoid walking barefoot
  • Change shoes daily
  • Keep feet clean and dry
  • Avoid home treatments

How can our chiropodist help with warts?

  • Perform a physical examination and evaluation
  • Initiate treatment, including possible surgical removal
  • Our foot clinic also has invested in laser, the latest weapon in the treatment of plantar warts

If you or a loved one requires honest, competent advice or foot care, please contact Dr. Hardy, owner of Academy Foot and Orthotic Clinics at 416-465-8737.

TORONTO CHIROPODIST AND FOOT SPECIALIST, MAR HARDY, D. Ch., B.Sc., PODIATRIC MEDICINE STATES THAT THERE ARE A NUMBER OF FOOT AILMENTS THAT ARISE AS A RESULT OF HAVING WET FEET OR WALKING IN COMMUNAL AREAS SUCH AS LOCKER ROOMS AND SWIMMING POOL PLATFORMS.  FOR INSTANCE, HPV, THE HUMAN PAPILLOMA VIRUS, CAN EASILY BE CONTRACTED IN THESE ENVIRONMENTS AND CAUSE PLANTAR WARTS.  FUNGAL NAILS ALSO DEVELOP AS A RESULT OF PICKING UP FUNGAS FROM THESE AREAS.

IF YOU LOVE TO SWIM, TRY TO WEAR SOMETHING ON YOUR FEET AS MUCH AS POSSIBLE WHEN YOU EXIT THE POOL.  TRY TO KEEP YOUR FEET DRY WITH A SIMPLE TOWEL RUB.  IF YOU OR A LOVED ONE ARE SUFFERING FROM EITHER OF THESE CONDITIONS, PLEASE DO NOT HESITATE TO CONTACT MY FOO CLINIC AT 416-465-8737.

BROUGHT TO YOU BY DR. JOHN A. HARDY, OWNER OF ACADEMY FOOT AND ORTHOTIC CLINICS.



Academy Clinics has a special interest in high quality custom orthotics.

 

416-465-8737

Toronto, ON Chiropodist
Academy Foot and Orthotic

752 BROADVIEW AVENUE
Toronto, ON M4K 2P1 

Across from the Broadview Subway
Professional  Family  Foot  Care

PROFESSIONAL
FOOT CLINIC

CHIROPODIST / FOOT SPECIALIST,  B.Sc. PODIATRIC MEDICINE / ACADEMY FOOT & ORTHOTIC CLINICS, 752 Broadview Ave , Toronto ON, M4K 2P1 416-465-8737