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TORONTO CHIROPODIST, D.Ch., B.Sc., PODIATRIC MEDICINE

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Posts for tag: feet

New York City is currently the epicenter of the tennis world, as the sport's top players from around the globe gather in hopes of claiming the fourth and final jewel in the 2018 grand slam crown. "Today's tennis isn't that of your grandmother," says podiatric foot and ankle specialist Diane Koshimune, DPM. "The power and athleticism of today's highly competitive game is light-years away from what it was just a decade ago. Those fantastic athletic feats on center court at the U.S. Open require healthy feet."
 
Dr. Diane Koshimune
 
 
"Tennis involves a great deal of foot work: quick acceleration, sudden stops and starts, twisting, pivoting, changes of direction, running backwards and sideways, and jumping during matches lasting three, four, or even five hours. This all puts the foot and ankle under tremendous stress and strain, making them susceptible to a number of foot and ankle-related problems for players," said Dr. Koshimune, a podiatric physician and surgeon on staff at Kaiser Permanente San Jose Medical Center in San Jose, California.
 
Source: DMN Newswire [9/7/18]
 
Courtesy of Barry Block, editor of PM News.
 
Brought to you by Doctor John A. Hardy, owner of Toronto's foot clinic, Academy Foot and Orthotic Clinics.

 

 

 

Bumps on feet can signal serious or non-serious conditions, so it's best to have all bumps properly examined by a foot and ankle surgeon. "The most common type of foot bump, ganglionic cysts, are soft, harmless, fluid-filled sacs found on the tendons and joints of the foot. Ganglionic cysts can be caused by a leaking of jelly-like fluid from the "capsule" surrounding the joint or tendon and may be on the top of the foot, near the ankle joint, or even on the side of the foot" says Michael Coyer, DPM.

 
Dr. Michael Coyer
 
 
"Plantar fibromas are another type of harmless bump found on the foot. Plantar fibromas are fibrous, hard bumps found within the ligament of the foot and are common in the arch area on the bottom of the foot. Non-surgical treatments, such as steroid injections or orthotic devices, may relieve symptoms. Surgical removal is an option for people who still have pain after trying non-surgical approaches," says Dr. Coyer.
 
Source: The Salem News [4/5/18]
 
Courtesy of Barry Block, editor of PM News.
 
Doctor John A. Hardy, owner of Toronto's Foot Clinic, Academy Foot and Orthotics Clinic.

 

 

 

 

 

Smelly socks, sandals and shoes and foul-smelling feet are all the result of bacteria breeding on sweat and building up in the foot area. Consultant podiatrist Matthew Fitzpatrick, spokesman for the College of Podiatry, says no one has inherently smelly feet and that it all comes down to poor hygiene. 
 
Matthew Fitzpatrick
 
 
"It’s not the sweat that smells but the bacteria that breaks down sweat on the foot, and if it’s not washed away and is allowed to build up in socks and shoes that aren’t changed regularly, then your feet become smelly," he says. "The main treatment for smelly feet is prevention, by keeping your feet clean and changing your shoes regularly," advises Fitzpatrick.
 
Source: Daily Mail [8/21/17]
 
Courtesy of Barry Block, editor of PM News.  
 
Brought to you by Doctor John A. Hardy, owner of Toronto's Foot Clinic, Academy Foot and Orthotic Clinics.
 
 

 

 

 

A study by researchers at Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) and Harvard Medical School suggests new guidelines may be in order for evaluating and treating lower extremity pain. Investigators set out to determine if there was a relation between foot pain and lower extremity joint pain, and they found a significant association between foot pain and knee or hip pain. "Studying the interaction between the knee and the foot, or the hip and the foot is very important because it's a kinetic chain," says Rock G. Positano, DPM, MPH, director of the Non-Surgical Foot and Ankle Service, Joe DiMaggio Sports Medicine Foot and Ankle Center at HSS.
 
Dr. Rock Positano
 
 
The kinetic chain, the notion that the body's joints and segments have an effect on one another during movement, can play a key role in pain. "The foot is the first part of the body that makes contact with the ground. Its primary function is a shock absorber. If the shock-absorbing capability of the foot is somehow altered or minimized, it's going to affect other body parts," Dr. Positano explains. Researchers found that foot pain was associated with bilateral and same-side knee pain in men and women. For example, men with right foot pain compared to those with no foot pain were five to seven times more likely to have pain in their right knee or in both knees. "Our overall goal was to provide practitioners with evidence-based guidance for evaluation and options for treatment for their patients," the researchers wrote in their paper, which appeared in the Journal of the American Podiatric Medical Association.
 
Source: EurekAlert [9/19/17]
 
Courtesy of Barry Block, editor of PM News.  
 
Brought to you by Doctor John A. Hardy, owner of Toronto's Foot Clinic, Academy Foot and Orthotic Clinics.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here’s another reason to use sunscreen: Melanoma—the most serious form of skin cancer—can grow underneath your nail bed on the nail plate and cause hyperpigmentation of the skin, explains podiatrist Dr. Jacqueline Sutera. It’s often a slow and painless growth, which makes it especially tricky to catch.
 One ominous sign: discoloration that extends beyond the nail and onto the cuticle, says Podiatrist Dr. Lori Weisenfeld. “If you’ve had no incidence of trauma and your nail is slowly starting to change color—especially if that color goes beyond your nail—you should get it checked out by your doctor,” she advises, adding that regularly pedicured patients should do a quick scan of their toes in between polish changes to catch any new developments. While melanoma can be deadly, it’s extremely rare and treatable if detected early. 
 
Source: Jenny McCoy, Runners World via Prevention 
 
Courtesy of Barry Block, editor of PMP News.  
 
Brought to you by Doctor John A. Hardy, owner of Toronto's Foot Clinic, Academy Foot and Orthotic Clinics.
 

 

 



Academy Clinics has a special interest in high quality custom orthotics.

 

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