416-465-8737

 

TORONTO CHIROPODIST, D.Ch., B.Sc., PODIATRIC MEDICINE

Archive:

Tags

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posts for: February, 2019

Blisters can form anytime a person is breaking in a new pair shoes. Dr. Heather Petrolla recommends treating small blisters, which are not expanding or filled with fluid, with antibiotic cream and a Band-aid. If you have a blister that is larger than one-half of an inch and it is filled with fluid, she recommends getting it checked out.
 
Dr. Heather Petrolla 
 
 
"Since your foot is down on the ground, you get a lot of really serious organisms when you are doing this. A lot of it is strep faecalis. It is feces, and you will get that in an infection. It can be really difficult to treat," said Dr. Petrolla.
 
Courtesy of Barry Block, editor of PM News.
 
Brought to you by Doctor John A. Hardy, owner of Toronto's foot clinic, Academy Foot and Orthotic Clinics.

 


Dr. Andrew Carver, a Washington podiatrist whose specialties include laser treatment of nail fungus infections, says that while people can acquire fungus at a nail salon, the average healthy person is not likely to walk out with diseased toenails and toes. In most cases of toenail fungus, he says, "there's an immune-system defect" that explains it. 
 
Dr. Andrew Carver
 
 
"Just make sure you aren't being treated with used pumice" - this porous rock used for exfoliating skin can harbor bacteria - "and don't be afraid to ask questions" about sterilization procedures for all equipment. The gold standard is to clean metal tools in an autoclave, a machine that sterilizes instruments using high-pressure, high-temperature steam. Cleaning tools in liquid disinfectant can kill most germs and viruses if they soak for at least 10 minutes, but that won't guarantee sterility, the doctors says.  
 
Courtesy of Barry Block, editor of PM News.
 
Brought to you by Doctor John A. Hardy, owner of Toronto's foot clinic, Academy Foot and Orthotic Clinics.

 


According to Dr. Eric Hart, "Many people trim toenails by tapering the corners so the nail curves with the shape of the toe. But this technique may encourage the toenail to grow into the skin of your toe. The sides or corners of this nail then dig into your skin. The surrounding skin is likely to become swollen and tender and can become infected. The problem most often occurs with the big toe." 
 
Dr. Eric Hart
 
 
"Shoe pressure, injury, fungus infection, heredity, and poor foot structure also may cause ingrown toenails. Trim toenails straight across, select proper shoe styles and sizes, and respond to foot pain in a timely manner, " says Hart.
 
Courtesy of Barry Block, editor of PM News.
 
Brought to you by Doctor John A. Hardy, owner of Toronto's foot clinic, Academy Foot and Orthotic Clinics.

 


Today a host of women are turning to cosmetic surgery to give their feet a “face lift” and fit them into high-fashion shoes. But physician members of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons, who specialize in foot surgery, are taking a stand and calling this an ill-advised trend. “Undergoing foot surgery solely for cosmetic reasons raises serious concerns,” says Michael Cornelison, DPM, FACFAS, a Cupertino, CA foot and ankle surgeon and Fellow member of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. “We need our feet for walking and getting around, so breaking these bones to reconstruct them for appearance’s sake is a troubling matter—it often affects function and can bring risks and complications.”
 
(L-R) Drs. Michael Cornelison and Thomas Roukis
 
 
“Those who are compelled by these terms to pursue cosmetic surgery for their feet should be sure to ask for a description of all the possible risks and negative consequences, along with what the procedure is expected to do,” urges Thomas S. Roukis, DPM, PhD, FACFAS, President of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons and a foot and ankle surgeon from La Crosse, WI. “To get a full understanding of the surgery, it’s important to seek the opinion of an experienced foot and ankle surgeon who has done these procedures for medical rather than cosmetic reasons.”  
 
Courtesy of Barry Block, editor of PM News.
 
Brought to you by Doctor John A. Hardy, owner of Toronto's foot clinic, Academy Foot and Orthotic Clinics.

 


So, about those shoes you just tried on: Did you ever stop to think how many other feet have also been inside them? Fungus that causes athlete's foot and the virus that causes plantar warts can lurk in shoes, says North Carolina podiatrist Jane E. Andersen, DPM, a member of the American Podiatric Medical Association. It turns out that those little boxes of disposable socks that shoe stores provide to you are there for a reason. Fungus and the wart-causing virus can lurk in shoes, especially shoes like boots, where moisture may be trapped inside. "A dry environment is less conducive to fungus than a moist environment," she says.
 
Dr. Jane Andersen
 
 
"There are some people who ... just, for whatever reason, their immune system doesn't fight it [infection] off as well," Andersen says. "So if you try on boots on the store, and someone else had fungus, and you put your sweaty foot back in your shoe, there's certain environments where it's more likely to take hold. And that's a moist, sweaty environment. So if your feet are more prone to that, you'll be more likely to have it."
 
Courtesy of Barry Block, editor of PM News.
 
Brought to you by Doctor John A. Hardy, owner of Toronto's foot clinic, Academy Foot and Orthotic Clinics.

 




Academy Clinics has a special interest in high quality custom orthotics.

 

416-465-8737

Toronto, ON Chiropodist
Academy Foot and Orthotic

752 BROADVIEW AVENUE
Toronto, ON M4K 2P1 

Across from the Broadview Subway
Professional  Family  Foot  Care

PROFESSIONAL
FOOT CLINIC

CHIROPODIST / FOOT SPECIALIST,  B.Sc. PODIATRIC MEDICINE / ACADEMY FOOT & ORTHOTIC CLINICS, 752 Broadview Ave , Toronto ON, M4K 2P1 416-465-8737