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TORONTO CHIROPODIST, D.Ch., B.Sc., PODIATRIC MEDICINE

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Posts for: October, 2018

The most common adult podiatric pathologies can often be genetically transferred to patients' offspring. In these scenarios, if the issue is identified and treated early enough, a child can potentially reduce the risk of pathologic development in the future. Louis DeCaro, DPM, vice president of the American College of Foot and Ankle Pediatrics and member of the surgical staff at Franklin Medical Center and Holyoke Hospital, MA discussed how to identify signs of adult podiatric pathologies in the pediatric populations at the Pedorthic Footcare Association Annual Symposium and Exhibition.

Dr. Louis DeCaro

 

According to DeCaro, there are 10 main pathologies in the adult population that can predict potential issues as children mature in adulthood. These pathologies are: calluses, plantar fasciitis, knee replacements, hip replacements, neuromas, bunions, posterior tibial dysfunction, tarsal tunnel syndrome, hammertoes, and lower back pain.

Courtesy of Barry Block, editor of PM News.

Brought to you by Doctor John A. Hardy, owner of Toronto's foot clinic, Academy Foot and Orthotic Clinics.

 


Many women report that they jump a shoe size or so when pregnant. It's not the baby on board that broadens out the maternal foot. Dr. Stephen Powless, president of the Minnesota Board of Podiatric Medicine and podiatrist at Park Nicollet Clinics, said hormones create the change. "The ligament in the arch is sensitive to the same hormones produced at the end of pregnancy that cause the pelvic ligaments to relax to allow for childbirth," he said. "The foot doesn't grow but it effectively gets longer and wider."

Feet are not just getting bigger. They are also getting wider. "This may have to do with the higher BMI [body mass index]," Powless said. "With increased weight, the arch flattens and the foot splays out." 

Courtesy of Barry Block, editor of PM News.

Brought to you by Doctor John A. Hardy, owner of Toronto's foot clinic, Academy Foot and Orthotic Clinics.


"Our increasingly sedentary lifestyle is literally killing us," says podiatrist Parminder Jagur, DPM. "Human beings were made to move. We are hardwired to walk and run. If you hold a baby as young as two months old upright with their feet on a flat surface, they will lift one foot and then the other. This involuntary 'walking reflex' is innate in us. Because walking comes so naturally to us, we tend to take it for granted.
 
Dr. Parminder Jagur
 
 
"Studies show that a 30-minute walk offers astounding benefits. Not only does it reduce the risk of coronary heart disease, diabetes, and cancer, but it also improves blood pressure, lowers risk of obesity, builds stronger bones, strengthen muscles, supports joints, slows mental decline, improves sleep, and enhances mental well-being," said Dr. Jagur.
 
Source: Market Insider [10/27/18]
 
Courtesy of Barry Block, editor of PM News.
 
Brought to you by Doctor John A. Hardy, owner of Toronto's foot clinic, Academy Foot and Orthotic Clinics.

 


A medical pedicure is much different than a cosmetic pedicure by a cosmetologist. This is not foot care to make your feet look beautiful, this is foot care that is essential for simply being able to walk and function during your daily life. A medical pedicure should be performed at a podiatrist 's office. It is much more hygienic, and it is more focused on medical care and not cosmesis.
 
Dr. Tomasz Biernacki
 
 
Tomasz Biernacki, DPM, who performs medical pedicures, states, "A medical pedicure is not something that should take a long time, ideally if you can come in for 5 minutes and have your foot pain relieved and make sure you don't have a fungal or bacterial infection, then that is the best thing we can do for you."  
 
Source: Market Insider [10/23/18]
 
Courtesy of Barry Block, editor of PM News.
 
Brought to you by Doctor John A. Hardy, owner of Toronto's foot clinic, Academy Foot and Orthotic Clinics.

 


Beware of light brown spiders with a dark mark on the back that resembles a violin. Sometimes called a “fiddleback” or “violin spider,” its name is the brown recluse and it packs a venomous bite. Dr. Eric Bouldin, a podiatric physician and surgeon said, “There are many types of venomous insects and spiders that can cause this type of wound, and people can react very differently to them,” Bouldin said.
 
Dr. Eric Bouldin
 
 
“Treatment always depends on the wound, but one particular man’s case was very unusual, and while we think it might have been a brown recluse bite that later became infected, we can’t be sure. “I normally see about two cases a year that are probably brown recluse bites, but the patient usually doesn’t bring it in, nor do I really want them to. “The best advice is prevention and early detection. If you think you’ve been bitten, see a doctor right away.”
 
Courtesy of Barry Block, editor of PM News.
 
Brought to you by Doctor John A. Hardy, owner of Toronto's foot clinic, Academy Foot and Orthotic Clinics. 

 




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