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TORONTO CHIROPODIST, D.Ch., B.Sc., PODIATRIC MEDICINE

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Posts for: September, 2018

"One piece of advice I give to a lot of patients in order to maintain foot health is stretching. Of the many biomechanical problems I address, equinus, or a tight Achilles cord, is the most common," says Dr. Kellen Cohn, a podiatrist at Advocate Good Shepherd Hospital in Barrington, IL.
 
Dr. Kellen Cohn
 
 
"In fact, most people have inadequate flexibility in their Achilles. This can exacerbate many problems including heel pain, forefoot ailments, tendonitis, or shin splints. Proper Achilles stretching techniques can help resolve many of these problems."
 
Source: Liz Donofrio, Daily Herald 
 
Courtesy of Barry Block, editor of PM News.
 
Brought to you by Doctor John A. Hardy, owner of Toronto's foot clinic, Academy Foot and Orthotic Clinics.

 


A recent survey noted that shoes are not worn by every child in every country. European teenagers and those in developed countries spend most of their days in shoes however, their South African counterparts and those in developing countries go barefoot most of the day. One may think that the reason for this is due to economic ranking, however, the reasoning may also be because it offers better foot structure.

Growing up in shoes leads to a more narrow foot type with a lower arch and causes more pressure at the heel and ball of the foot than over a widespread area. Individuals who grow up barefoot in contrast, have wider feet and a more even distribution of pressure across the foot.

Individuals who grow up running barefoot land on their mid and forefoot more in comparison to a heel strike which is a very common area of pain for individuals who wear shoes. When running with shoes on, the knee is fully extended and can lead to injuries in the shins, feet and knees.

It has also been seen that individuals who grow up running barefoot can run for longer distances and more quickly than their counterparts.

Thus, before thinking that wearing shoes at all times is helpful, in some cases, going barefoot is equally as good for the feet. Options to transition from wearing shoes to going bare foot include minimalist shoes which have minimal cushioning compared to the normal “running shoe”.

Brought to you by Doctor John A. Hardy, owner of Toronto's foot clinic, Academy Foot and Orthotic Clinics. 


According to podiatrist Michael C. Saraydarian, DPM, “The first course of action when treating foot fungus is topical care. Try to control the moisture levels your feet are exposed to by choosing shoes that breathe well, changing your socks a few times throughout the day, and allowing as much exposed, fresh air time as possible out of shoes and socks at home." 
 
Dr. Michael Saraydarian
 
 
"Additionally, you may try using topical antifungal creams that can be purchased at any grocery or drug store. One of the most common foot fungi is tinea pedis, more widely known as 'athlete’s foot.' This form of foot fungus usually responds well to at-home treatments, but if you have exhausted the aforementioned options and your fungus hasn’t been resolved, you should call your primary care physician or speak with a podiatrist/chiropodist who can better diagnose your fungus and prescribe you a more aggressive oral antifungal medication,” says Dr. Saraydarian. 
 
Source: Diane Atwood, Bangor Daily News [1/11/17]
 
Courtesy of Barry Block, editor of PM News.
 
Brought to you by Doctor John A. Hardy, owner of Toronto's foot clinic, Academy Foot and Orthotic Clinics.

 


An important, but forgotten, part of foot care is how well shoes fit and their effect on toenails and other parts of the foot, Dr. Elizabeth Barnica said. "Proper shoes and fit are really important to help prevent foot problems," she said. "You don't want to measure your feet from heel to toe anymore. You want to measure from the heel to where your foot bends, which usually results in a bigger shoe size."
 
Dr. Elizabeth Barnica
 
 
Measuring from heel to ball helps in choosing the correct-size shoe that will give the toes plenty of space and prevent jamming of the toes at the end of the shoe. "If we're constantly putting our feet in too-tight shoes, we're damaging toenails, which may contribute to the development of fungal nails and hammertoes," she said.
 
Source: Carthage Press [1/16/17]
 
Courtesy of Barry Block, editor of PM News.
 
Brought to you by Doctor John A. Hardy, owner of Toronto's foot clinic, Academy Foot and Orthotic Clinics.

 


There's no place like home for Dorothy's stolen ruby shoes. The Wizard of Oz's Dorothy had her shoes stolen 13 years ago from a Minnesota museum named the Judy Garland Museum and have finally rightfully been returned.

The shoes were stolen in 2005 when a thief climbed through a window and broke into the display case of the $1 million insured shoes. These iconic shoes were worn by the actress Judy Garland in 1939 during the movie the "Wizard of Oz". The shoes were placed in a Minnesota museum named after the actress, known as the Judy Garland Museum. These shoes are made out of many materials including: wood pulp, silk, plastic and glass. 
 
These shoes have made headlines as these shoes are more than just shoes but rather a symbol that represents many memories, culture, values and a unique time period. However, the thief has still not been found but investigators are actively still searching for the culprit.
 
Brought to you by Doctor John A. Hardy, owner of Toronto's foot clinic, Academy Foot and Orthotic Clinics.

 




Academy Clinics has a special interest in high quality custom orthotics.

 

416-465-8737

Toronto, ON Chiropodist
Academy Foot and Orthotic

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Toronto, ON M4K 2P1 

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FOOT CLINIC

CHIROPODIST / FOOT SPECIALIST,  B.Sc. PODIATRIC MEDICINE / ACADEMY FOOT & ORTHOTIC CLINICS, 752 Broadview Ave , Toronto ON, M4K 2P1 416-465-8737