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TORONTO CHIROPODIST, D.Ch., B.Sc., PODIATRIC MEDICINE

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Posts for: May, 2018

 

 

Bumps on feet can signal serious or non-serious conditions, so it's best to have all bumps properly examined by a foot and ankle surgeon. "The most common type of foot bump, ganglionic cysts, are soft, harmless, fluid-filled sacs found on the tendons and joints of the foot. Ganglionic cysts can be caused by a leaking of jelly-like fluid from the "capsule" surrounding the joint or tendon and may be on the top of the foot, near the ankle joint, or even on the side of the foot" says Michael Coyer, DPM.

 
Dr. Michael Coyer
 
 
"Plantar fibromas are another type of harmless bump found on the foot. Plantar fibromas are fibrous, hard bumps found within the ligament of the foot and are common in the arch area on the bottom of the foot. Non-surgical treatments, such as steroid injections or orthotic devices, may relieve symptoms. Surgical removal is an option for people who still have pain after trying non-surgical approaches," says Dr. Coyer.
 
Source: The Salem News [4/5/18]
 
Courtesy of Barry Block, editor of PM News.
 
Doctor John A. Hardy, owner of Toronto's Foot Clinic, Academy Foot and Orthotics Clinic.

 


 

 

 

Many salons offer callus remover procedures, often using cheese grater-like devices (or the real things!), but this can be very dangerous, warns Jacqueline Sutera, DPM, a podiatrist in Manhattan. "When these go too deep and are used on patients with thin skin, poor circulation, or diabetes, it can cause burns and terrible wounds or infections," she says. 
 
Dr. Jacqueline Sutera
 
 
To avoid this, she recommends using creams specially made for thicker foot skin. "These creams have gentler ingredients like urea and lactic acid and can be used several times a week to keep skin smooth and thin out calluses in little time," Dr. Sutera adds.
 
Source: Jenn Sinrich, Reader's Digest [4/12/18]
 
Courtesy of Barry Block, editor of PM News.
 
Brought to you by Doctor John A. Hardy, owner of Toronto's Foot Clinic, Academy Foot and Orthotics Clinic. 

 


 

 

"Ankle sprains can vary in severity from mild to severe. Mild ankle sprains may cause swelling, bruising, difficulty moving, and tenderness. They can be treated using the RICE method, which stands for rest, ice, compression, and elevation. If your ankle isn’t feeling better after two weeks, it’s time to follow up with a specialist to make sure the sprain isn’t worse and that nothing is broken. Severe sprains can mean the ligament in your ankle is torn and are normally accompanied by more intense symptoms" says Brent Evans, DPM, a podiatric surgeon at Triad Foot & Ankle Center and a member of Cone Health Medical Group.
 
Dr. Brent Evans
 
 
"Mild sprains may only take a few days of rest and ice to heal, while others may require immobilization of the ankle through a walking boot or something similar. Frequent ankle sprains or injuries can lead to instability and damage to the ankle, which may require surgery," says Dr. Evans.
 
Source: Fox-8 [4/11/18]
 
Courtesy of Barry Block, editor of PM News.
 
Brought to you by Doctor John A. Hardy, owner of Toronto's Foot Clinic, Academy Foot and Orthotics Clinic.

 


 

 

 

If your toenail is about to fall off, you're probably thinking "Help!" in sheer panic and making the same face as the "scream" emoji. But when it comes to losing one of these little guys, it pays to take a chill pill and wait. It's worth giving your toe a little extra TLC because you definitely don't want an infection to spread to the new nail growing in"Redness/drainage/excessive pain could be signs of infection but not always," says Said Atway, DPM, a podiatrist at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center.
 
Dr. Said Atway
 
 
"The consequences of a bacterial infection in the toe are the same as the consequences of any other skin/soft tissue infection in that the infection could spread and lead to further detriment of the surrounding tissue," Dr. Atway says. Obviously, not great—so if you think it could be infected, go get it looked at by a doc.
 
Source: Isadora Baum, Shape [4/18/18]
 
Courtesy of Barry Block, editor of PM News.
 
Brought to you by Doctor John A. Hardy, owner of Toronto's Foot Clinic, Academy Foot and Orthotic Clinics.

 


 

 

 

Warmer weather provides a great opportunity for dressing up, and for many women that includes slipping on a pair of high heels to complete the look. It also means millions of teenage girls are sliding into stilettos for prom. According to Clarksburg podiatrist Dr. Keith Newman, his two concerns for those who wear heels 2 inches or higher would be the effects from the increased load on the forefoot and the potential for adaptation of the Achilles tendon.
 
Dr. Keith Newman
 
 
The Achilles tendon may shorten in individuals who wear heels as it adapts to the shortened position from the higher heeled shoe, he said. “Some people will adapt over years or decades of use, and then they may not be able to wear flat shoes effectively anymore without pain,” Newman said.
 
Source: JoAnn Snoderly, The Exponent Telegram [4/23/18]
 
Courtesy of Barry Block, editor of PM News.
 
Brought to you by Doctor John A. Hardy, owner of Toronto's Foot Clinic, Academy Foot and Orthotics Clinics.

 

 




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