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TORONTO CHIROPODIST, D.Ch., B.Sc., PODIATRIC MEDICINE

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Posts for: March, 2018

 

 

 

Dr. Jacqueline Sutera is on a crusade against cheap flip-flops. The New York City­–based podiatrist and board-certified foot surgeon could not warn me enough of the perils of walking for an extended period of time atop flimsy rubber slabs. When we spoke on the phone about how to choose a comfortable sandal for travel, Dr. Sutera was quick to point out what to avoid: stay away from sandals that are super thin and flat.
 
Dr. Jacqueline Sutera
 
 
“We all know that they’re really bad for your feet, especially for women,” she said. “Little girls can kind of get away with [wearing thin sandals] for a while. It doesn’t start to catch up with you until later on in life, but I have 20- and 30-year-olds walking around in them all summer and they wonder why their feet hurt in August. It’s not good.” So what does make for a good walking sandal? Dr. Sutera mentioned three main characteristics: a supportive sole, thick straps, and some sort of back.
 
Source: Richelle Szypulski, Travel+Leisure [3/26/18]
 
Courtesy of Barry Block, editor of PM News.  
 
Brought to you by Doctor John A. Hardy, owner of Toronto's Foot Clinic, Academy Foot and Orthotic Clinics.

 


 

 

 

 

MARZ HARDY AND HER HUSBAND, DOCTOR JOHN A. HARDY WILL BE ATTENDING A MEDICAL SEMINAR IN SUNNY FLORIDA AND WILL ALSO BE BRINGING OUR 2 GRANDCHILDREN AND NIECE.  5 DAYS WILL ABOARD THE DISNEY CRUISE SHIP, DISNEY DREAM.

OUR TORONTO FOOT CLINIC, ACADEMY FOOT AND ORTHOTIC CLINICS IS CONSTANTLY STRIVING TO INCREASE OUR KNOWLEDGE AND TECHNOLOGY IN ORDER TO PROVIDE OUR BELOVED PATIENTS WITH THE BEST POSSIBLE FOOT CARE AND TREATMENTS.

BROUGHT TO YOU BY DOCTOR JOHN A. HARDY OWNER OF TORONTO'S FOOT CLINIC, ACADEMY FOOT AND ORTHOTIC CLINICS.

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

"Shoes with thick foam liners or soles can often effectively provide enough cushion for the foot to ease the pain of walking or standing for many. Shoes with thin fabric uppers with fewer stitched seams can often adequately provide the stretch needed to accommodate bunions and hammertoe contractures for many. These softer-soled or cushion shoes decrease what is known as the proprioception in our feet," says podiatrist David Raynor, DPM.
 
Dr. David Raynor
 
 
"One risk of proprioception compromise is falling, which can be potentially devastating. Many times, a loss of proprioception is not noticed as its progression is so gradual. EMG/NCV testing by a neurologist can objectively confirm compromise to the nervous system. Self-evaluation, observation by family/friends, or a health/gait examination can also indicate balance issues," says Dr. Raynor.
 
Source: Citrus County Chronicle [2/26/18]
 
Courtesy of Barry Block, editor of PM News.
 
 Brought to you by Doctor John A. Hardy, owner of Toronto's Foot clinic, Academy Foot and Orthotic Clinics.

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

Identifying and addressing foot problems as a result of diabetes should be a priority for diabetics. A podiatrist with Baylor College of Medicine outlines the types of foot issues that can be encountered and how they can be treated. “Diabetes is a multi-system disease, and the circulation in the feet and legs may be diminished because there are problems with blood vessels that get narrowed or clogged as a result of the diabetes,” said  Ronald Lepow, DPM, assistant professor of orthopedic surgery at Baylor. “A major cause of foot problems in diabetics is lack of blood flow.”
 
Dr. Ronald Lepow
 

A common foot issue in diabetics is that pressure areas, such as callused or injured areas, do not heal as rapidly due to poor circulation as they would in a person who is not diabetic, Dr. Lepow said. This can lead to ulcerations or a variety of infections in these traumatized areas. To treat an ulcer on the foot, a podiatrist will take all precautions to ensure there is no pressure in the area of the ulcer. This can mean wearing an orthotic, special shoe, or even a boot during the time the ulcer is treated.

Source: Dipali Pathak, Milwaukee Community Journal [3/6/18]  
 
Courtesy of Barry Block, editor of PM News.
 
Brought to you by Doctor John A. Hardy, owner of Toronto's Foot Clinic, Academy Foot and Orthotic Clinics.
 
 
 


 

 

 

 

Dr. Cary Zinkin
 
 
Do feet really get bigger with age? Some strange facts end up being debunked, but this is certainly possible: "After years of wear and tear, tendons and ligaments in your feet may weaken. This can cause arches to flatten, which means feet get wider and longer. It won’t happen to everyone, though—people who are overweight, who get swollen feet or ankles, or who have certain medical conditions, like diabetes, are more prone. If it does happen, the average gain is about one shoe size by age 70 or 80," says Cary M. Zinkin, DPM, podiatric sports physician and spokesperson for the American Podiatric Medical Association.
 
Source: Teresa Dumain, Reader's Digest  
 
Courtesy of Barry Block, editor of PM News.  
 
Brought to you by Doctor John A. Hardy, owner of Toronto's Foot Clinic, Academy Foot and Orthotic Clinics.
 
 




Academy Clinics has a special interest in high quality custom orthotics.

 

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CHIROPODIST / FOOT SPECIALIST,  B.Sc. PODIATRIC MEDICINE / ACADEMY FOOT & ORTHOTIC CLINICS, 752 Broadview Ave , Toronto ON, M4K 2P1 416-465-8737