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TORONTO CHIROPODIST, D.Ch., B.Sc., PODIATRIC MEDICINE

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Posts for: January, 2018

 

 

 

 

It’s practically unheard of for a runner to never have been injured. But sports podiatrist Franklin Kase, DPM, of Providence Saint Joseph Medical Center and Burbank Podiatry Associates Group, can boast such a non-event. In his 40 years of running, he has completed 50 half marathons and six full marathons without suffering any leg or foot injuries. “I’m 66 and I feel great,” he says. We asked him about his secrets for staying injury-free and his tips for choosing a supportive shoe.
 
Dr. Franklin Kase
 
 
Kase emphasizes, “It’s critical to have a good supportive shoe in whatever activity you do. [That alone] is going to reduce the risk of injury. Tremendously, that’s why I’ve really been able to prevent injury.” If you’re getting adequate support for your feet, you’re getting adequate support for your knees, your hips, and even your back, he says.
 
Source: Brenda Wong, Toluca Lake [1/8/18]  
 
Courtesy of Barry Block, editor of PM News.  
 
Brought to you by Doctor John A. Hardy, owner of Toronto's Foot Clinic, Academy Foot and Orthotic Clinics.
 
 


 

 

 

Nurse Mates, a trusted leader in healthcare professional footwear, accessories, and apparel has announced the expansion of its ALIGN™ orthotic collection, releasing its debut lifestyle footwear collection for men. Nurse Mates first released ALIGN™ technology in Spring 2016, offering a lifestyle collection of women’s footwear equipped with an ergonomically-designed built-in orthotic. Dr. Dorothy Kurtz Phelan, a board certified podiatrist and expert in foot health, played an integral role in the initial development of ALIGN™ technology. 
 
Dr. Dorothy Kurtz Phelan
 
 
“Throughout my years of practice, I’ve observed a huge void in the men’s orthotic footwear market. While they have the same issues with fatigue, pain, and mis-alignment that women do, men’s footwear often lacks comfort and stability. There is a clear necessity for a men’s product with corrective technology and support,” said Dr. Kurtz Phelan.
 
Source: Cision [1/29/18]
 
Courtesy of Barry Block, editor of PM News.  
 
Brought to you by Doctor John A. Hardy, owner of Toronto's Foot Clinic, Academy Foot and Orthotic Clinics.

 


 

 

 

A team, dubbed the “Relentless Rowers,” had hoped to break the world mark by completing the voyages from the Canary Island of La Gomera to the Caribbean island of Antigua in under 35 days. And this they did with a couple of days to spare while also claiming solely for themselves the Irish record for a transatlantic row.
 
(L-R) Seán Underwood, Pat O’Connor, Eoin O’Farrell, and Thomas Browne
 
 
The team, comprising of junior doctors Seán Underwood and Patrick O’Connor, Cork-based podiatrist Eoin O’Farrell, and young Dublin entrepreneur Thomas Browne, were the first all-Irish four-man crew to complete the challenge. The Relentless Rowers have now raised close to 24,000 euros for Cork University Hospital and Pieta House.
 
Source: Ray O’Hanlon, Irish Echo [1/29/18]  
 
Courtesy of Barry Block, editor of PM News.  
 
Brought to you by Doctor John A. Hardy, owner of Toronto's Foot Clinic, Academy Foot and Orthotic Clinics.
 
 

 

 

 


 

 

"Achilles tendinitis is an overuse injury of the Achilles tendon. This often occurs in runners or other sports enthusiasts who engage in repetitive motion of the legs. It can happen from the sudden shifts in movement in those who play sports like tennis, or it can happen when a runner suddenly increases the intensity or duration of training. It usually begins with a tenderness in the calf or above the heel after exercise. It can become more painful with intense exertion (like hill running), and you might wake up with a stiffness in the back of the leg that improves with movement," says Nicole Freels, DPM.
 
Dr. Nicole Freels
 
 
"It is important to note that Achilles tendinitis is preventable. While we may not be able to control the wear and tear on our bodies as we age (any long-term runner can attest to having at least one issue in their running careers!) or having flat feet, there are other choices that can prevent this condition. First, ease into your training plan. If you want to increase your mileage or intensity, do so slowly. Make sure to warm up properly before hitting it hard. Also, vary your terrain. If you are doing lots of hills, it may be a good idea to throw some flat runs in for variety. Lastly, stretch carefully before and after each run," says Dr. Freels.  
 
Source: Kentucky Forward [1/23/18]
 
Courtesy of Barry Block, editor of PM News.  
 
Brought to you by Doctor John A. Hardy, owner of Toronto's Foot Clinic, Academy Foot and Orthotic Clinics.

 


 

 

 

 

Why do runners' toenails tend to fall off? Allan Rothschild, DPM, a podiatrist in Dunedin, Florida, who has been treating Tampa Bay area runners of all ages for years, said it's all that running. Rothschild explained that during the push-off phase of your gait, when one foot is behind you and the other one is striking the ground, the toes on your trailing foot are extended up. When these toes are hyperextended, they hit the toe box of your shoe. Even though your shoe is relatively soft, that contact is a microtrauma. When you’re running five to ten miles per day, or even more in a half or full marathon, those microtraumas can add up.
 
Dr. Allan Rothschild
 
 
“Runners can experience discolored nails, which is a collection of blood beneath the nail plate (subungual hematoma) as a result of microtrauma to the toe against the ‘shoe box,’” Rothschild said. The bleeding can in turn cause the nail plate to separate from the nail bed and fall off. Merely losing a toenail is not cause for panic. “If you’re a runner, you develop a hematoma underneath the nail plate, and the nail falls off, you’re going to grow another nail back normally,” Rothschild says. “It’s a vicious cycle—it might happen again in six months.”
 
Source: Ally Spiroff, Runner's World [1/10/18]  
 
Courtesy of Barry Block, editor of PM News.  
 
Brought to you by Doctor John A. Hardy, owner of Toronto's Foot Clinic, Academy Foot and Orthotic Clinics
 
 




Academy Clinics has a special interest in high quality custom orthotics.

 

416-465-8737

Toronto, ON Chiropodist
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CHIROPODIST / FOOT SPECIALIST,  B.Sc. PODIATRIC MEDICINE / ACADEMY FOOT & ORTHOTIC CLINICS, 752 Broadview Ave , Toronto ON, M4K 2P1 416-465-8737