416-465-8737

 

TORONTO CHIROPODIST, D.Ch., B.Sc., PODIATRIC MEDICINE

Archive:

Tags

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posts for: December, 2017

 

 

 

Footbeat is a Grand Junction-based company started by David and Matt Mayer that makes a device that helps medical patients and athletes increase circulation by acting like a heart for a person's feet and legs by compressions of the veins in the feet. The device sits in the insole of a person's shoes and provides a compression to the arch of the foot at certain intervals. The increased circulation helps remove tissue fluid and metabolic waste to jump-start the healing or recovery process. 
 
Footbeat orthotics
 
 
The product fits in certain shoes and is operable through a remote control and can be programmed through a phone app. It only works when the person is sitting or lying down and immediately shuts off when walking, as each step produces a similar blood flow.
 
Source: Joe Vaccarelli, The Daily Sentinel [12/26/17]
 
Courtesy of Barry Block, editor of PM News.  
 
Brought to you by Doctor John A. Hardy, owner of Toronto's Foot Clinic, Academy Foot and Orthotic Clinics.

 


 

 

 

 

"Weeping, difficult-to-heal leg wounds are often due to venous insufficiency," says podiatrist David Raynor, DPM. "Venous insufficiency is sluggish blood flow in veins of the lower extremity. Veins do not possess the muscular quality of arteries and are more vulnerable to stretching when tasked with more volume than they were meant to handle. The heart is not strong enough to pump blood to the toes and back itself," says Dr. Raynor.
 
Dr. David Raynor
 
 
"Applying ointments and bandages to weeping legs rarely helps wounds to heal, because the weeping isn’t simply due to a wound; rather, it is due to the fluid pressure beneath the skin. Reducing the fluid volume and pressure beneath the skin is necessary for successful healing in most cases. Compression hose and specialized dressings called Unna’s boots are mainstays of treatment for this problem for some patients when indicated; however, applying pressure dressings should not be done until the cause of the fluid issue is properly diagnosed," says Raynor. 
 
Source: Citrus County Chronicle [12/25/17]
 
Courtesy of Barry Block, PM News.  
 
Brought to you by Doctor John A. Hardy, Owner of Toronto's Foot Clinic, Academy Foot and Orthotic Clinics.
 
 


 

 

 

 

"Ankle sprains are a common injury that occurs when the ankle rolls, twists, or turns in an awkward way. When the ankle twists, it can strain, stretch or tear the ligaments that help stabilize the joint. Two of the most common types of sprains are lateral (spraining the outside of the foot), or high ankle sprains. High ankle sprains are more common in athletes, and occur when there is tearing of the ligaments that connect the tibia to the fibula," says Matthew Wagoner, DPM, a podiatrist at Triad Foot Center and a member of the Cone Health Medical Group.
 
Dr. Matthew Wagoner
 
 
"The first step in treating a sprained ankle is to reduce inflammation and swelling through rest, applying ice, wrapping the injury in an ace bandage, and elevating the ankle. Further treatment depends on the severity of the injury and if the individual is able to bear weight on it. Mild sprains may only take a few days of rest and ice to heal, while others may require immobilization of the ankle through a walking boot or something similar. Ankle sprains very rarely require surgery," says Dr. Wagoner.
 
Source: Myfox.com [9/1/17]
 
Courtesy of Barry Block, editor of PM News Brought to you by Doctor John A. Hardy, owner of Toronto's Foot Clinic, Academy Foot and Orthotic Clinics.
 
 


 

 

 

 

"Out-toeing is less common than in-toeing in children. Children who suffer from out-toeing resemble penguins walking – feet pointing out almost as if they are in first or second dance position and with almost a waddle-like gait. Out-toeing can cause pain," says Nicole G. Freels, DPM
 
Dr. Nicole Freels
 
 
"It occurs in children who are born with external rotation contractures in the hips when he/she first begins walking. In other words, the muscles are either too weak or too tight. Other causes of out-toeing include the tibia or femur bone being twisted, which is typically more common in children with neuromuscular abnormalities. Usually, out-toeing becomes recognizable in children who are between 1 and 2 years of age," says Dr. Freels.
 
Source: Kentucky Forward
 
Courtesy of Barry Block, editor of PM News.  
 
Brought to you by Doctor John A. Hardy, owner of Toronto's Foot Clinic, Academy Foot and Orthotic Clinics.
 
 


 

 

 

 

According to podiatrist and foot care expert at City Feet Clinic, Kate McArthur, anyone who has feet needs to schedule for a regular medical pedicure. A what? A medical pedicure is a non-invasive, dry procedure performed by highly skilled foot care specialists who combine podiatry with nail care.
 
Kate McArthur
 
 
“Usually, people who come in for a medical pedicure mention they have a slight pain or a corn on their little toe, but it turns out they’ve had it for months and it has become painful and turned into a full-blown ulcer simply because they just thought a medical pedicure wasn’t needed,” explains McArthur.
 
Source: Juna Xu, Body and Soul [12/22/17]
 
Courtesy of Barry Block, editor of PM News.  
 
Brought to you by Doctor John A. Hardy, owner of Toronto's Foot Clinic, Academy Foot and Orthotic Clinics.
 
 




Academy Clinics has a special interest in high quality custom orthotics.

 

416-465-8737

Toronto, ON Chiropodist
Academy Foot and Orthotic

752 BROADVIEW AVENUE
Toronto, ON M4K 2P1 

Across from the Broadview Subway
Professional  Family  Foot  Care

PROFESSIONAL
FOOT CLINIC

CHIROPODIST / FOOT SPECIALIST,  B.Sc. PODIATRIC MEDICINE / ACADEMY FOOT & ORTHOTIC CLINICS, 752 Broadview Ave , Toronto ON, M4K 2P1 416-465-8737