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TORONTO CHIROPODIST, D.Ch., B.Sc., PODIATRIC MEDICINE

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Posts for: July, 2017

 

 

Lee Firestone, a DC podiatrist, running coach, and longtime runner, recommends wearing tight acrylic socks and a tried-and-true running shoe, and keeping your toenails short. (He sees plenty of blisters and lost toenails in the medical tent during races.)
 
Dr. Lee Firestone
 
 
If it’s particularly hot, lace your shoes higher to prevent your foot from moving around in your shoe, which can cause too much skin friction. “We often get blisters running downhill because the foot is moving forward in the shoe,” Firestone says.
 
Source: Gabriella Boston, Washington Post [4/12/17]  
 
Courtesy of Barry Block, editor of PMP News.  
 
Brought to you by Doctor John A. Hardy, owner of Toronto's Foot Clinic, Academy Foot and Orthotic Clinics.
 
 
 

 

 

 


 

 

Radiologists look at a new image every three to four seconds during an eight-hour workday. That's hardly enough time to find the patterns, abnormalities, and other markers essential in making a diagnosis. Hospitals are hoping to lessen that load by outsourcing some of that work -not to people across the ocean, but rather to machines. These computers, running artificial intelligence and machine-learning algorithms, are trained to find patterns in images, and identify specific anatomical markers. But they also go deeper and spot details the human eye can't catch. Early versions of these algorithms, currently in trials, are both accurate and fast.
 
One potential problem, howver, is how the algorithms are initially trained. Sometimes, the data they're fed in the learning process come from just one specific model of imaging machine. Because different models have different radiation doses and slightly different technologies, “you've got an inherent bias that's built in,” said Steve Tolle, vice president and chief strategist of IBM's Watson Health Imaging. To help avoid that bias, IBM is using a collaborative approach, working with 20 health systems to use images from many different sources to develop its Watson cognitive platforms, which one day, Tolle said, will be able to perform image analytics.
 
Source: Rachel Z. Arndt, Modern Healthcare [7/8/17]  
 
Courtesy of Barry Block, editor of PMP News.  
 
Brought to you by Doctor John A. Hardy, owner of Toronto's Foot Clinic, Academy Foot and Orthotic Clinics.
 
 
 

 

 

 


 

 

 

Cracked heels can be sore and unsightly, and may even lead to bleeding and dangerous bacteria entering your body as cellulitis. However, with 30 per cent of people more aware of the condition of their feet in the summer - compared with just five per cent in winter - now would be a good time to pay attention to them. Emma Supple, a podiatrist, said: "Feet are hardworking – or at least they should be! Sitting on a couch all day will keep them pristine, but by staying healthy and moving around, they naturally attract dirt and grime that can cause hard skin and cracked heels."
 
"These are commonly caused by a loss of ‘elasticity’ in the skin when dryness sets in, or when the skin thickens and cracks or breaks under pressure, which can occur through everyday activities such as walking and exercise." She suggests you should add scrubbing feet, moisturizing them, and choosing the right shoes into your daily routine.
 
Source: Lauren Clark, Express [7/6/17]  
 
Courtesy of Barry Block, editor of PMP News.  
 
Brought top you by Doctor John A. Hardy, owner of Toronto's Foot Clinic, Academy Foot and Orthotic Clinics.
 
 

 

 


 

"If you’re a baby boomer getting back into fitness and sports, you should get your ankles checked for chronic instability caused by injuries that might not have healed properly years ago. Many Boomers who suffered ankle sprains in their younger years could be at risk for more serious damage as they age and try to stay active. It is estimated that one in four sports injuries involves the foot or ankle, and a majority of them occur from incomplete rehabilitation of earlier injuries," saysBrandon Bishop, DPM.
 
Dr. Brandon Bishop
 
 
"The more often one injures their foot and ankle, the more often the injury increases in severity. If you are unstable walking or roll your foot or ankle often, you may benefit from an examination. Some ankle sprains can result in foot and ankle joint arthritis. If your foot and ankle are prohibiting you from doing the activities you would like to do, there are things we can do to help. There are both good surgical and non-surgical options. One should not have to live with pain with every footstep," says Dr. Bishop.
 
Source: The News-Review [7/12/17]  
 
Courtesy of Barry Block, editor of PMP News.  
 
Brought to you by Doctor John A. Hardy, owner of Toronto's Foot Clinic, Academy Foot and Orthotic Clinics.
 
 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Dr. Kenneth Oglesby, a podiatrist for IU Health Southern Indiana Physicians in Bloomington, said that although some people don’t believe it, studies have shown that increased pain from a former injury can correlate with a change in temperature, barometric pressure or precipitation, especially in arthritic patients. And sunny weather without precipitation is when rheumatoid arthritis patients tend to be most comfortable, he said.
 
Dr. Kenneth Oglesby
 
 
Oglesby’s patients often describe the site of the former injury (such as a broken bone or tendon injury) or surgery as feeling a little tight and achy for a short period. “It could be related to atmospheric pressure causing fluid levels to change within the joints,” he said, although other factors could be at play. Rain and prolonged cold weather can give people a gloomy outlook, for example, causing them to be depressed and inactive.
 
Source: Jenny Porter Tilley, Herald Times Mail [4/14/17]  
 
Courtesy of Barry Block, editor of PMP News.  
 
Brought to you by Doctor John A. Hardy, owner of Toronto's Foot Clinic, Academy Foot and Orthotic Clinics.

 

 

 




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