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TORONTO CHIROPODIST, D.Ch., B.Sc., PODIATRIC MEDICINE

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Posts for: August, 2016

 

Athlete's foot is a skin disease caused by a fungus, usually occurring between the toes.

The fungus most commonly attacks the feet because shoes create a warm, dark, and humid environment which encourages fungus growth.

The warmth and dampness of areas around swimming pools, showers, and locker rooms, are also breeding grounds for fungi. Because the infection was common among athletes who used these facilities frequently, the term "athlete's foot" became popular.

Not all fungus conditions are athlete's foot. Other conditions, such as disturbances of the sweat mechanism, reaction to dyes or adhesives in shoes, eczema, and psoriasis, also may mimic athlete's foot.

Symptoms

The signs of athlete's foot, singly or combined, are drying skin, itching scaling, inflammation, and blisters. Blisters often lead to cracking of the skin. When blisters break, small raw areas of tissue are exposed, causing pain and swelling. Itching and burning may increase as the infection spreads.

Athlete's foot may spread to the soles of the feet and to the toenails. It can be spread to other parts of the body, notably the groin and underarms, by those who scratch the infection and then touch themselves elsewhere.

The organisms causing athlete's foot may persist for long periods. Consequently, the infection may be spread by contaminated bed sheets or clothing to other parts of the body.

Prevention

It is not easy to prevent athlete's foot because it is usually contracted in dressing rooms, showers, and swimming pool locker rooms where bare feet come in contact with the fungus. However, you can do much to prevent infection by practicing good foot hygiene. Daily washing of the feet with soap and water; drying carefully, especially between the toes; and changing shoes and hose regularly to decrease moisture, help prevent the fungus from infecting the feet. Also helpful is daily use of a quality foot powder.

Tips

  • Avoid walking barefoot; use shower shoes.
  • Reduce perspiration by using talcum powder.
  • Wear light and airy shoes.
  • Wear socks that keep your feet dry, and change them frequently if you perspire heavily.

Treatment

Fungicidal and fungistatic chemicals, used for athlete's foot treatment, frequently fail to contact the fungi in the horny layers of the skin. Topical or oral antifungal drugs are prescribed with growing frequency.

In mild cases of the infection it is important to keep the feet dry by dusting foot powder in shoes and hose. The feet should be bathed frequently and all areas around the toes dried thoroughly.

Consult Your Chiropodist

If an apparent fungus condition does not respond to proper foot hygiene and self care, and there is no improvement within two weeks, consult your chiropodist. The chiropodist will determine if a fungus is the cause of the problem. If it is, a specific treatment plan, including the prescription of antifungal medication, applied topically or taken by mouth, will usually be suggested. Such a treatment appears to provide better resolution of the problem, when the patient observes the course of treatment prescribed by the chiropodist; if it's shortened, failure of the treatment is common.

Athlete's Foot Tips 

  • Avoid walking barefoot; use shower shoes.
  • Reduce perspiration by using talcum powder.
  • Wear light and airy shoes.
  • Wear socks that keep your feet dry, and change them frequently if you perspire heavily
  • Brought to you by Dr. John A. Hardy, owner of Toronto foot clinic, Academy Foot and Orthotic Clinics.

 

 


 

What are plantar warts?

Warts are one of several soft tissue conditions of the foot that can be quite painful. They are caused by a virus, which generally invades the skin through small or invisible cuts and abrasions. They can appear anywhere on the skin, but, technically, only those on the sole are properly called plantar warts.

Children, especially teenagers, tend to be more susceptible to warts than adults; some people seem to be immune.

Identification Problems

Most warts are harmless, even though they may be painful. They are often mistaken for corns or calluses—which are layers of dead skin that build up to protect an area which is being continuously irritated. The wart, however, is a viral infection.

It is also possible for a variety of more serious lesions to appear on the foot, including malignant lesions such as carcinomas and melanomas. Although rare, these conditions can sometimes be misidentified as a wart. It is wise to consult a chiropodist when any suspicious growth or eruption is detected on the skin of the foot in order to ensure a correct diagnosis.

Plantar warts tend to be hard and flat, with a rough surface and well-defined boundaries; warts are generally raised and fleshier when they appear on the top of the foot or on the toes. Plantar warts are often gray or brown (but the color may vary), with a center that appears as one or more pinpoints of black. It is important to note that warts can be very resistant to treatment and have a tendency to reoccur.

Source of the Virus

The plantar wart is often contracted by walking barefoot on dirty surfaces or littered ground where the virus is lurking. The causative virus thrives in warm, moist environments, making infection a common occurrence in communal bathing facilities.

If left untreated, warts can grow to an inch or more in circumference and can spread into clusters of several warts; these are often called mosaic warts. Like any other infectious lesion, plantar warts are spread by touching, scratching, or even by contact with skin shed from another wart. The wart may also bleed, another route for spreading.

Occasionally, warts can spontaneously disappear after a short time, and, just as frequently, they can recur in the same location.

When plantar warts develop on the weight-bearing areas of the foot—the ball of the foot, or the heel, for example—they can be the source of sharp, burning pain. Pain occurs when weight is brought to bear directly on the wart, although pressure on the side of a wart can create equally intense pain.

Tips for Prevention

  • Avoid walking barefoot, except on sandy beaches.
  • Change shoes and socks daily.
  • Keep feet clean and dry.
  • Check children's feet periodically.
  • Avoid direct contact with warts—from other persons or from other parts of the body.
  • Do not ignore growths on, or changes in, your skin.
  • Visit your chiropodist as part of your annual health checkup.

Self Treatment

Self treatment is generally not advisable. Over-the-counter preparations contain acids or chemicals that destroy skin cells, and it takes an expert to destroy abnormal skin cells (warts) without also destroying surrounding healthy tissue. Self treatment with such medications especially should be avoided by people with diabetes and those with cardiovascular or circulatory disorders. Never use them in the presence of an active infection.

Professional Treatment

It is possible that your Chiropodist will prescribe and supervise your use of a wart-removal prepa- ration. More likely, however, removal of warts by a simple surgical procedure, performed under local anesthetic, may be indicated.

Lasers have become a common and effective treatment. A procedure known as CO2 laser cautery is performed under local anesthesia either in your podiatrist’s office surgical setting or an outpatient surgery facility. The laser reduces post-treatment scarring and is a safe form for eliminating wart lesions.

Wart Tips From The APMA

Self treatment is generally not advisable. Over-the-counter preparations contain acids or chemicals that destroy skin cells, and it takes an expert to destroy abnormal skin cells (warts) without also destroying surrounding healthy tissue. Self treatment with such medications especially should be avoided by people with diabetes and those with cardiovascular or circulatory disorders. Never use them in the presence of an active infection.

  • Avoid self treatment with over the counter preparations.
  • Seek professional podiatric evaluation and assistance with the treament of your warts.
  • Diabetics and other patients with circulatory, immunological or neurological problems should be especially careful with the treament of their warts.
  • Warts may spread and are catching. Make sure you have your warts evaluated to protect yourself and those close to you.

      Brought to you by Dr. John A. Hardy, owner of Toronto foot clinic,      Academy Foot and Orthotic Clinics.

 

 


 

 

RECENTLY WHILE CRUISING THE TORONTO HARBOUR I NOTICED A LARGE NEW BOAT DOCKED AT THE FOOT OF SHERBOURNE FOR SEVERAL WEEKS.  LAST WEEK I READ AN ARTICLE IN THE NATIONAL POST WHICH ANSWERED THE MYSTERY.  IT WAS THE KING OF NORWAY, KING HARALD WHO WAS COMPETING IN SAILING RACES AT THE AGE OF 78.  

GOOD FOR HIM!

BROUGHT TO YOU BY DR. JOHN A. HARDY, OWNER OF TORONTO FOOT CLINIC, ACADEMY FOOT AND ORTHOTIC CLINICS.


 

The quality of life degenerates rapidly for a person who is unable to move about freely. And, in an era of concern with spiraling healthcare costs, care for a bedridden person is considerably more expensive -- whether paid for by the individual, a family, insurance, or the government.

Chiropodists help keep older patients on their feet and active, which is critically important to their overall health.

The complex engineering marvels that keep people mobile -- the feet -- change as an inevitable effect of aging. Nails get thicker, skin drier and such problems as corns, calluses, arthritis, bunions and hammertoes increase. It is common for the foot's natural cushion to thin out and lose some of its shock absorbing quality.

For healthcare, the aging of North American society has been called the most profound demographic change of the 20th century, creating a whole new set of problems.

A Chiropodist's specialized education and training places him or her in the unique position of helping an aging society deal with increasing medical difficulties. And medical records indicate that Chiropodists have become one of the providers of choice for seniors seeking foot care.

Older patients benefit from periodic visits to chiropodists:

  • Serious systemic problems -- arthritis, diabetes, kidney problems, circulatory disorders, bone conditions, etc. -- often are indicated initially by symptoms in the feet and legs.
  • Each of the foot joints can be afflicted with arthritis, making feet more susceptible to a painful disease that can disable a person.
  • Older men and women may develop osteoporosis, a loss of bone mass that makes them fragile. Once minor incidents -- bumping a toe or dropping something on the foot -- can lead to a debilitating fracture.
  • Of the 2.1 million people 65 and over who have diabetes, nearly 65,000 have diabetic foot disease.

For older Ontarians, good foot health can be the difference between enjoyment or infirmity, active involvement or debilitating decline.

Keeping Ontario's aging population active longer and more capable of caring for themselves is critical to the Provinces economic well-being. Good foot care by Ontario's Chiropodists is an important part of this equation.

Brought to you by Dr. John A. Hardy, owner of Toronto foot clinic, Academy Foot and Orthotic Clinics.

 


 

  • Death is the number 1 killer in the world.
  • Life is sexually transmitted.
  • Good health is merely the slowest possible rate at which one can die.
  • Give a person a fish and you feed them for a day. Teach a person to use the Internet and they won’t bother you for weeks, months, maybe years.
  • Health nuts are going to feel stupid someday, lying in the hospital, dying of nothing.
  • All of us could lake a lesson from the weather. It pays no attention to criticism.
  • In the 60s, people took acid to make the world weird. Now the world is weird. and people take Prozac to make it normal.
  • Don’t worry about old age: It doesn’t last that long.

        THANKS J.M. FOR SHARING




Academy Clinics has a special interest in high quality custom orthotics.

 

416-465-8737

Toronto, ON Chiropodist
Academy Foot and Orthotic

752 BROADVIEW AVENUE
Toronto, ON M4K 2P1 

Across from the Broadview Subway
Professional  Family  Foot  Care

PROFESSIONAL
FOOT CLINIC

CHIROPODIST / FOOT SPECIALIST,  B.Sc. PODIATRIC MEDICINE / ACADEMY FOOT & ORTHOTIC CLINICS, 752 Broadview Ave , Toronto ON, M4K 2P1 416-465-8737